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Research Start Page: Find Articles

Research tips, resources and links to library related information.

Find It @ Georgia College

The database only gives me a citation, or just an abstract. How do I find the full text?

The button lets you know if the full-text of the article is available:

1. online through another library database.


2. in print by doing a search in the Library Catalog.


3. available via interlibrary loan by making an ILLiad request.

Scholarly vs. Popular Periodicals

BOOKS, ARTICLES, DATABASES, & MORE

GALILEO: Search the Georgia College collection for books and e-books, media (videos and audio recordings), government documents, musical scores, plays, print journals and microfiche. Also, search online databases and journals for articles, proceedings, and papers. 


GIL Universal Catalog: Find resources in other libraries in the University System. Use GIL Express to request the items from another library in the University System of Georgia.

WorldCat: Search libraries outside Georgia. If you find something you need, use Interlibrary Loan to request items from libraries outside the University System of Georgia.

Scholarly vs. Popular Sources

When conducting research it is important to distinguish between journal articles and magazine articles. Journal articles are typically referred to as "scholarly," while magazine articles are usually considered "popular".

CriteriaScholarly JournalPopular Magazine
Example
Content In-depth, primary account of original findings written by the researcher(s); very specific information, with the goal of scholarly communication. Secondary discussion of someone else's research; may include personal narrative or opinion; general information, purpose is to entertain or inform.
Author Author's credentials are provided; usually a scholar or specialist with subject expertise. Author is frequently a journalist paid to write articles, may or may not have subject expertise.
Audience Scholars, researchers, and students. General public; the interested non-specialist.
Language Specialized terminology or jargon of the field; requires expertise in subject area. Vocabulary in general usage; easily understandable to most readers.
Graphics Graphs, charts, and tables; very few advertisements and photographs. Graphs, charts and tables; lots of glossy advertisements and photographs.
Layout & Organization Structured; includes the article abstract, goals and objectives, methodology, results (evidence), discussion, conclusion, and bibliography. Informal; may include non-standard formatting. May not present supporting evidence or a conclusion.
Accountability Articles are evaluated by peer-reviewers* or referees who are experts in the field; edited for content, format, and style. Articles are evaluated by editorial staff, not experts in the field; edited for format and style.
References Required. Quotes and facts are verifiable. Rare. Little, if any, information about source materials is given.
Other Examples Annals of Mathematics, Journal of Abnormal Psychology, History of Education Quarterly, Almost anything with Journal in the title.

Time, Newsweek, The Nation, The Economist

This is a modified version of a document created by Amy VanScoy at NCSU Libraries.